The Metronome Hack

The Metronome Hack

By Haley Stephenson A smartphone app set the tempo for a fix to bring the International Space Station (ISS) back online after a thermal system failed.

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Creating NASA’s Knowledge Map

Creating NASA’s Knowledge Map

By Matthew Kohut and Haley Stephenson   Need to understand something about engine cutoff sensors, the physiological impact of extended stays in low-Earth orbit, or how to drive a rover on Mars? That kind of specialized expertise exists at NASA, and often nowhere else.

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The Hitchhiker’s Guide to Software Engineering at NASA

The Hitchhiker’s Guide to Software Engineering at NASA

By Haley Stephenson   Using a wiki platform, the NASA Software Engineering Working Group has set a new precedent for collaboratively authoring, reviewing, and enabling interactivity for handbooks at NASA.

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The Toothbrush Hack

The Toothbrush Hack

By Haley Stephenson   Collaborative problem solving, a jumper lead, and a toothbrush turned around an unsuccessful late-August spacewalk.

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Something to Shout About: Bloodhound Supersonic Car

Something to Shout About: Bloodhound Supersonic Car

By Haley Stephenson   The Bloodhound Supersonic Car aims to set a new land-speed record and a new standard for openness in projects.

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Weathering Ike

Weathering Ike

By Haley Stephenson   Opening the International Space Station under normal circumstances is challenging. Doing it during the third-costliest hurricane to hit the United States is another story.

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Factoring in Humans

Factoring in Humans

By Haley Stephenson   To a rocket scientist, you are a problem. You are the most irritating piece of machinery he or she will ever have to deal with. You and your fluctuating metabolism, your puny memory, your frame that comes in a million different configurations. You are unpredictable. You’re inconsistent. You take weeks to […]

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From Sketch Pad to Launchpad

From Sketch Pad to Launchpad

By Haley Stephenson   For Tom Moser, getting the first shuttle off the ground took more than technical know-how.

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